A Wealth Creation Journal

Dart Group – Memo post FY17 results

Thomas’s enthusiasm on religiously updating this blog has put me to shame and as such I will share my latest thoughts on Dart post the latest results release last week.

While many investors counsel against sharing investment ideas because it exposes one to commitment bias. Despite the commitment bias risk, I want to document my thoughts ex-ante so that I can remove any hindsight bias should my judgement prove to be wealth destructive. So here we go:

Post the results, DTG share price went on free fall – a whooping 20% drop in 2 days. Just like TC, DTG makes up ~25% of my portfolio. So this was emotionally hard to bear despite all the lessons of rationality that we keep reading about in books.

The market reacted violently because:

  • Operating profit probably did not meet market expectations given the run-up in share price before the results release
  • Huge uncertainty associated with the non-UK ownership issue

I suspect the issue surrounding non-UK ownership was the more important driver is pushing the share price down. As we all know, market hates and punishes uncertainty very punitively.

From an operational perspective, I was very happy with the progress that DTG is making for couple of reasons:

  • The capex numbers confirmed a previous assumption that DTG has ~50% discount on the listing price of the new Boeing 737-800s
  • Revenue growth in winter season continued which is critical as the newer fleet would have to be justified by better utilization rate all year round
  • Advanced revenue jumped 40% YoY which is STRONG indicator of the success of the new bases – Stansted and Birmingham
  • Net debt was very much under control helped by the cash flow generated by negative working capital with growth

The main reason for softer EBIT margin was due to one-off costs and cost ramp up in new airports (Stansted and Birmingham) i.e. the cost was incurred before the revenue came in.

When we decided to invest in DTG in Oct 2016, the biggest risk was that Brexit would lead to a sharp drop in demand for oversea package holidays which would be disastrous for DTG as it was taking on debt to purchase new aircraft. Increasing capacity through debt when demand is about to decline is a recipe for massive value destruction as witnessed in many of the commodity companies.

However the strong advanced sales and the revenue growth in FY17 indicated that the demand for package holiday in the UK has not been affected by the weaker Sterling post Brexit. This corroborates the UK holiday data released by ONS in May 2017. The strong growth in advanced sales is an important signal because it implies that people are booking their summer holidays as usual. In fact the strong demand for FY 2017 summer is particularly encouraging because Britons would have fully digested the impacts of Brexit and still decided to spend on holiday in the subsequent year.

The implication of the above point is that our worst-case scenario is increasingly unlikely to happen and as such the downside risk of an investment in DTG is diminishing. Operationally, the range of outcomes for DTG in the next 2 years is heavily skewed to the base and bull case. (Base case assumed growth associated opening 2 new bases and no growth afterwards and bull case assumes that there is still 5% organic growth in topline after the new bases are up and running at steady state)

Going forward, I think the value of DTG is driven by the following factors:

  1. Normalized run-rate FCF in base case in GBP 120 – 140m which implies an FCF yield of 17% based on the share price today
  2. Pay down of debt will lead to appreciation of equity value
  3. Given a mix of old and new aircraft in the fleet today, DTG can choose to retire old planes more quickly depending on the demand conditions. Full credit to TC for his insight on this point
  4. Multiple expansion as the company proves its success with the new bases and lower leverage in the steady state environment

As such I have added and will continue to add to my DTG position if the price goes down further in the absence of new information.

On the non-UK ownership point, the context is such that both EU and UK requires their airlines to be majority owned by EU or UK nationals. Before Brexit, UK airlines just have to comply with the EU regulations. Post Brexit, UK airlines have to ensure that the company is majority UK owned to maintain its operating license. DTG is proposing to add a new clause to the article of association to force any non-UK shareholders to sell his/her shares. Ryanair and Easyjet already have this clause in their article of association. The worst case is that we are forced to sell when the share price is very low as we are not UK nationals.

Firstly, DTG noted in its announcement that they believe currently non-UK shareholders make up less than 35% of the shareholder base. DTG is 40% owned by its founder, Philip Meeson who is a UK national. Secondly, the company will try its best to avoid activating such clause unless absolutely required. Thirdly, we still dont know how the Brexit negotiation will play out on this issue – maybe it is favorable maybe it is not.

So there is a good chance that this clause is not required. But the important question is if the company decided to trigger this clause how are they going to decide which shareholders to force sell. I.e. if there are 40% non-UK shareholders and DTG wants to bring that down to 35%. How do they choose which 5% of the non-UK shareholder base to force sell?

The company did not comment on this. But we decided to look at Ryanair and Easyjet for inspiration. It turns out that it depends on the chronological order at which non-UK shareholders register their shares with the company. For example, if you are the first non-UK shareholder to register with the company then you are the last one to be forced to sell. And they will first force sell the shareholders who have not registered with the company. So this gave me great comfort that as long as I register my shares with DTG asap, I should be okay.

So I am comfortable with the two issues and continue to hold the DTG shares. Of course I change my mind when the facts change to quote John Maynard Keynes.

MC

4 Comments

  1. TC

    Thinking about biases that cancel out, I think we have a “bias bias” (& this comment proves the point again)

  2. Eoghan O' Connor Byrne

    Hey, I agree with you on Dart and I have a similar position sizing. You have made some points I have not thought about before in this and other posts. Good to see some fresh insight, I just wish I could have been on to this when you were in Autumn. Happy investing!
    I wrote this article on SA about Dart
    https://seekingalpha.com/article/4088373-dart-group-plc-move-quick-take-advantage-mr-markets-overreaction

  3. xiaoming

    I think the market is very concerned about UK customers spending power against the background of Brexit and aviation industry regulation uncertainties. In the middle of seemingly hard times, any plan of expansion will be dealt with extra care. Fingers crossed for DART.

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